Alexander Langmuir, MD
CDC  Polio  Viral Fear Racket

[Viral Fear Racket man.]

Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS)

"[The CDC's] disease-control mission was increasingly being regarded as obsolete, prompting serious discussions about abolishing the CDC altogether.
    The situation changed in 1949 when the CDC brought on board Alexander Langmuir, an associate professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. Langmuir was the CDC's first VIP, bringing with him both his expertise in epidemiology (the statistical study of epidemics) and his high-level connections -- including his security clearance as one of the few scientists privy to the Defense Department's biological warfare program...
...Langmuir and talked public officials and Congress into giving the CDC contingent powers to deal with potential emergencies... In July of 1951 he assembled the first class of the Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS), composed of twenty-three young medical or public health graduates. After six weeks of intensive epidemiological training, these EIS officers were assigned for two years to hospitals or state and local health departments around the country. Upon completing their field experience, EIS alumni were free to pursue any career they desired, on the assumption that their loyalties would remain with the CDC and that they would permanently act as its eyes and ears. The focus of this elite unit was on activism rather than research and was expressed in its symbol -- a shoe sole worn through with a hole. According to British epidemiologist Gordon Stewart, a former CDC consultant, the EIS was nicknamed the "medical CIA ----Duesberg's Inventing The AIDS Virus (1996) (Source: http://www.geocities.com/harpub/pol_all.htm

''Talk to your grandmother about measles. Ask her if she saw death and destruction from the disease. It was not a disease that needed eradication. The high death rates were in countries where children were undernourished and lacked vitamins necessary to process the virus. Alexander Langmuir, MD is known today as "the father of infectious disease epidemiology." In 1949 he created the epidemiology section of what is now known as the CDC. He also headed the Polio Surveillance Unit that was started in 1955 after the polio vaccine misadventures. Dr Langmuir knew that measles was not a disease that needed eradication when he said:     "To those who ask me, 'Why do you wish to eradicate measles?,' I reply with the same answer that Hillary used when asked why he wished to climb Mt. Everest. He said, 'Because it is there.' To this may be added, ". . and it can be done." [11]  Langmuir also knew that by the time vaccination was developed, measles mortality in the USA had already declined to minimal levels when he described measles as a
    "... self-limiting infection of short duration, moderate severity, and low fatality..." [12]
    The vaccine was created because it could be done, not because we needed it. Measles is not eradicated. Outbreaks happen all over the world, and will continue. And now infants will be unprotected because of the absence of maternal antibodies in their vaccinated mother's milk. So much for protecting the most vulnerable in the herd.''  [2012] Herd Immunity: Flawed Science and Mass Vaccination Failures by Suzanne Humphries, MD

Epidemic Intelligence Service Claims Credit for Addressing Polio Vaccine Scare in the 1950s.  The quick work of the EIS under Dr. Langmuir's direction helped allay fears, rescue the vaccine program, and restore public confidence in the vaccine and the U.S. Public Health Service