Beneficial effects of mumps

See: Positive effect of childhood diseases  Beneficial effects of measles/Citations

"Mumps is a common childhood disease which is benign in the in the vast majority of cases. It is desirable that mumps be contracted in early childhood because, when contracted in adulthood, the disease may cause meningitis and/or damage to the testes, ovaries, auditory nerves or pancreas. However, and equally importantly, women are less likely to contract ovarian cancer if they have had mumps during childhood (West 1966)."---Viera Scheibner, Ph.D.

"A study by Ronne (Lancet, 5/5/85 1-5) showed that adults who had had natural measles with a rash had a decreased incidence of various cancers, including cervical. Another study showed that women are less likely to contract ovarian cancer if they have had mumps during childhood."--Dr Jayne Donegan

"After contracting measles and other childhood illnesses (e.g.. chickenpox, scarlet fever, whooping cough, rubella, mumps and may be others), it has been widely accepted by many health practitioners, including experienced orthodox paediatricians that this is often beneficial for the general health of many children. Specifically it has been shown that children contracting measles naturally were less likely to suffer from allergic conditions such as asthma, eczema and hayfever, (Lancer June 29 1996)."---Trevor Gunn BSc

"Vaccination stops children having their childhood diseases at the beneficial age (3-4yrs). Children are now susceptible to Rubella and Mumps at just the age when girls can conceive and boys can be made sterile.  Antibodies from vaccination do not cross the placenta to make very young babies immune with the result that children of less than one year old are more likely to get them. In the case of Whooping cough this is just the time that the disease is likely to cause neurological damage."---Dr Jayne Donegan

"Years ago there was a boy, a leukemia patient at the City of Hope, who spontaneously developed a case of mumps and the leukemia was cured."--Ruth Sackman (Cancer Forum, Spring 2002)